Noodlings

askmaridee:

Where can you find me at SDCC?
I’ll be at Artist Alley table EE-10. The map gives you an idea of where that is located in comparison to the Hasbro and IDW booths.
I’ll be signing at the IDW booth on Sunday from 3-4. I’ll also be attending the Sunday 10 am IDW Kids Comics panel to cheer on my editor David Hedgecock, most likely near the front.
I’ll have a few Celestia micros with me and LPS #2. Celestia micros won’t last long!

Important information! We’re only a few days away from my flight south.
Jul 21, 2014 / 3 notes

askmaridee:

Where can you find me at SDCC?

I’ll be at Artist Alley table EE-10. The map gives you an idea of where that is located in comparison to the Hasbro and IDW booths.

I’ll be signing at the IDW booth on Sunday from 3-4. I’ll also be attending the Sunday 10 am IDW Kids Comics panel to cheer on my editor David Hedgecock, most likely near the front.

I’ll have a few Celestia micros with me and LPS #2. Celestia micros won’t last long!

Important information! We’re only a few days away from my flight south.

Original 1982 Figment doll
Jul 20, 2014 / 1 note

Original 1982 Figment doll

thebiscuiteternal:

becausedragonage:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

20. OMG. That’s just about exactly how long it’s been since I seriously bought comics. The 90’s belch. So…it was a thing for girls then?
Considering the crappy art, demeaning stories and Bad Girl craze, it’s not surprising.

In 1997, my 12 year old butt set foot in a comic book store exactly once. After being mocked soundly by *much* older boys because the only two comics I read at the time were the “weak-ass” Sabrina and Sonic (my uncle had let me read his Avengers collection, but my parents cut me off those after seeing 90s violence, yeehaw. if only they knew what it was like now.), I never went to one again until I hit college. I stuck to the grocery store racks and the only bookstore (the now defunct Waldenbooks) that carried comics in our area.

Waldenbooks! That would be where I had the discussion with my dad over the spinner rack that ended with him telling me I was too old for comic books. There are too many comments on this thread exactly like this one above, the direct market model really did discourage a lot of women.
Jul 20, 2014 / 4,496 notes

thebiscuiteternal:

becausedragonage:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

20. OMG. That’s just about exactly how long it’s been since I seriously bought comics. The 90’s belch. So…it was a thing for girls then?

Considering the crappy art, demeaning stories and Bad Girl craze, it’s not surprising.

In 1997, my 12 year old butt set foot in a comic book store exactly once. After being mocked soundly by *much* older boys because the only two comics I read at the time were the “weak-ass” Sabrina and Sonic (my uncle had let me read his Avengers collection, but my parents cut me off those after seeing 90s violence, yeehaw. if only they knew what it was like now.), I never went to one again until I hit college. I stuck to the grocery store racks and the only bookstore (the now defunct Waldenbooks) that carried comics in our area.

Waldenbooks! That would be where I had the discussion with my dad over the spinner rack that ended with him telling me I was too old for comic books. There are too many comments on this thread exactly like this one above, the direct market model really did discourage a lot of women.

There are a lot of uses for this image.
Jul 19, 2014 / 28 notes

There are a lot of uses for this image.

What’s wrong [with the comics industry]? … In the late ’70s, all the comic fans decided to get into the business. The problem is, it was a bunch of superhero fans. And an industry that had, up until that point, catered to almost every genre imaginable slowly and slowly was narrowed down and boiled down to a point where it was superhero comics, and that’s all there were. And then they all were writing these comics for each other — not for a mass market, not for young people. And then, as they aged, the content aged to suit their needs. And the idea is, when you’re an adult, you’re supposed to turn to other forms of entertainment, maybe, or appreciate comics for what they were. But that hasn’t been the case. So now we have superheroes that rape, we have heroin addicts, we have all this kind of bullshit that’s been heaped onto these characters that were meant to entertain kids and give them a little sense of right and wrong and adventure. I think it’s so sad. And you see what the strategy has done. … In 1972, Jimmy Olsen comics sold 200,000 copies a month, and it was canceled because that wasn’t enough to keep it going. These days, the best-selling book can barely scrape past 70,000 — never mind the worst-selling books. So let’s take a look at that strategy that’s been applied to this business. How’d it work out? Not too good. And the less people that read ‘em, the more expensive they have to be, and the more cryptic they have to be to cater to that tiny little market they’ve got. That’s what’s wrong.

Darwyn Cooke (via comicquotations)

Epic rant.

(via superdames)

Also applicable to miyazaki’s statement the other day

(via fujoshifeminism)

(via mindeclipse)

Jul 18, 2014 / 6,012 notes
barucassanova:

durnesque-esque:

delightfullyauburn:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

as a comic-book buying, reading, and loving girl - fantastic! :) 

Fantastic… but also sad. I’m grateful to Comixology, as it’s allowing me to get into comics too, but sad that big and little girls alike are too afraid of the atmosphere of a real comic book store. 

What is comixology?

For anybody that might be unfamiliar, Comixology is a digital platform for buying and reading comics. It’s the way I got to try out Pretty Deadly and Figment #1, both sold out in my local comic book stores because they didn’t buy very many copies. And I got to buy them and read them from the comfort of my couch long after stores were closed.
Like I explained to these girls, Comixology offers a subscription service similar to the subscription model that used to keep Disney comics going during the 1960s and 1970s. I subscribe to 15 comics per month and receive a notification when they’re ready for download. Since comics are unlikely to go back to the grocery store anytime soon and young girls aren’t used to seeking out shops, getting the word out about digital options is our most promising hope for getting comics into the hands of young girls again.
Jul 18, 2014 / 4,496 notes

barucassanova:

durnesque-esque:

delightfullyauburn:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

as a comic-book buying, reading, and loving girl - fantastic! :) 

Fantastic… but also sad. I’m grateful to Comixology, as it’s allowing me to get into comics too, but sad that big and little girls alike are too afraid of the atmosphere of a real comic book store. 

What is comixology?

For anybody that might be unfamiliar, Comixology is a digital platform for buying and reading comics. It’s the way I got to try out Pretty Deadly and Figment #1, both sold out in my local comic book stores because they didn’t buy very many copies. And I got to buy them and read them from the comfort of my couch long after stores were closed.

Like I explained to these girls, Comixology offers a subscription service similar to the subscription model that used to keep Disney comics going during the 1960s and 1970s. I subscribe to 15 comics per month and receive a notification when they’re ready for download. Since comics are unlikely to go back to the grocery store anytime soon and young girls aren’t used to seeking out shops, getting the word out about digital options is our most promising hope for getting comics into the hands of young girls again.

Jul 18, 2014 / 2 notes

Tweeks! are my new favorite thing. Get the guide on how to enjoy San Diego Comic Con like a native from two girls who have pictures of themselves at the con as LITTLE BITTY BABIES!

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.
Jul 18, 2014 / 4,496 notes

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

ruckawriter:

brianmichaelbendis:

Batman, Green Arrow, and the Question poster by Denys Cowan & Bill Sienkiewicz.This piece was created for a retail poster to promote the 1988 three-part “Fables” story arc that ran through Detective Annual #1, Green Arrow Annual #1, and Question Annual #1.

Framed and in the hallway. One of my few prized possessions. 

This is one of the most 80s things I’ve ever seen.
Jul 17, 2014 / 740 notes

ruckawriter:

brianmichaelbendis:

Batman, Green Arrow, and the Question poster by Denys Cowan & Bill Sienkiewicz.

This piece was created for a retail poster to promote the 1988 three-part “Fables” story arc that ran through Detective Annual #1, Green Arrow Annual #1, and Question Annual #1.

Framed and in the hallway. One of my few prized possessions. 

This is one of the most 80s things I’ve ever seen.

Brittany Biskit as Daisy in ‘The Great Gatsby,’ kicking a boy while he’s down. As they do.
Littlest Pet Shop #3 out today!
Jul 16, 2014 / 5 notes

Brittany Biskit as Daisy in ‘The Great Gatsby,’ kicking a boy while he’s down. As they do.

Littlest Pet Shop #3 out today!